Opportunities

***At this time, we deeply regret that we cannot accept any new undergraduate researchers to the laboratory due to difficulties imposed by the pandemic. Please check back in Fall 2021, when we hope that the lab will have fully reopened to allow undergraduate research. Thank you and stay well!

Postdoctoral researchers –

Seeking to hire postdoctoral scholar in physiological ecology and evolution
Funded postdoc available to collaborate with Lauren Buckley at U Washington, Sean Schoville at U Wisconsin, and Caroline Williams at UC Berkeley on an NSF RoL project. Apply physiology, genomics, and ecology and evolution to investigate fecundity and survival constraints for grasshoppers along a beautiful montane elevation gradient in CO. Aiming to improve predictions of climate change responses. Applications due Feb 15th 2021, and evaluated on rolling basis http://faculty.washington.edu/lbuckley/?p=685

I am always interested in hearing from near-graduates or postdocs who are working in the area of evolutionary environmental physiology, who are interested in studying the intricate interrelationships between metabolism and life history. I will work with interested candidates to develop funding proposals.

Prospective graduate students 

Graduate student admissions are closed for the year, the next admission cycle will bring in late summer 2021. To apply, please contact Caroline will an expression of interest and CV well before the closing date of applications (usually early December). You can find more information here: https://ib.berkeley.edu/grad/admissions/index.php

The main research areas in the lab are evolutionary impacts of seasonality, stress (particularly cold) responses, and life history evolution in variable environments. Students typically combine field experiments and natural history, lab-based physiology and biochemistry, and ecological modeling to address the overarching question of how organisms respond to variable and changing environments. Our graduate program values independence, so the student will develop their own project in collaboration with Dr. Williams, but will be encouraged to work on one of the existing study systems in the lab, including montane willow leaf beetles (evolutionary impacts of seasonality), and wing polymorphic crickets (mechanisms of life history evolution). The Department of Integrative Biology values diversity in organisms, approaches, and scientists, and we particularly encourage and support applications from people historically excluded from STEM. We invest in the personal and professional development of all lab members, and we have a lot of fun together while doing so. Applications are due in early December, but interested candidates are strongly encouraged to contact Caroline prior to applying on cmw@berkeley.edu, with a CV and a brief description of your research interests. Competitive applicants will have a strong background in ecology, physiology, or evolutionary biology, experience carrying out and communicating independent research, and be an excellent team player ready to contribute to a collaborative lab environment.

Prospective undergraduate students – positions not available until Fall 2021

There are two ways that you can get involved in research in the Williams lab: through the URAP program (http://urap.berkeley.edu/) or as an undergraduate volunteer researcher. We are likely to be advertising several URAP projects in August 2018 (application period 15-27 August). These are advertised university-wide, so are likely to be competitive and best for someone with some familiarity with lab environments.

The other opportunity for undergraduates to be involved in the lab is as an undergraduate research assistant. This would be the most appropriate track for someone with limited research experience, right through to experienced undergraduate researchers. Undergraduate researchers will be paired with a graduate student, and will start by doing animal husbandry, lab maintenance (including dish washing), and helping with experiments.  Undergraduates who prove reliable and talented will have the opportunity to learn how to perform biochemical assays, participate in experimental data collection and field work, and eventually experimental design and execution of your own independent project. Full training is provided at every step, the only prerequisites are abundant enthusiasm for science, a good work ethic, detail-oriented personality, and the ability to work both independently and as part of a team. Outstanding undergraduates have gone on to co-author manuscripts, present at national meetings, win awards, and enter graduate or medical school (see my CV for a list of co-authored publications and presentations: undergraduates are indicated with a “U”).

Whatever track you enter the lab under, I am interested in forming long-term mentoring relationships with talented undergraduates, and will support and encourage you to fully participate in the intellectual life of the lab. We will have weekly lab meetings, and you will have the opportunity to collaborate within the lab and the wider department. The expected time commitment would be ~10h/week in Fall and Spring, ~20h/week in Summer.

If you are interested in a position, please email me with short (max one paragraph) full sentence answers to the following questions:

Subject: Seeking research position in Williams lab – [Your name]

1) What are your scientific interests?
2) Why are you interested in working in our research lab?
3) What skills do you have that may be useful in a research setting?
4) Can you commit at least 5h/week, and what is your availability?